Destination development – Nome Cultural Festival

Group 11. Photo: Private

Written by: Marjolein Schram, Jasmin Saleh, Aryan Sarvarsen, Avto Saginadze.
Destination development group 11, autumn 2019, University of South-Eastern Norway, campus Bø.

Nome Cultural Festival

Name of concept/idea

We’ve decided to call it something easy, such as “Nome’s kul festival” – we find it describes the festival in good way, by also setting the “cultural” aspect in focus also eventually lure in tourists with cultural preferences or with a cultural experience in mind. We’re thinking that the location should be around Lunde, but some parts of the festival will also be part of Ulefoss. 

The concept/idea

The concept is an inspiration of the Skalldyrfestivalen in Mandal. We’re thinking of a traditional festival that holds the cultural heritage as the core. We want to put the locals, and their heritage, experiences and cultures as a core factor – we’re thinking of a constantly evolving festival where locals and others outside Nome meet up and experience the festival together. We want to engage conversations, we want them to talk TO EACHOTHER not AT EACHOTHER, it’s something many people don’t do anymore. To connect and converse. 

How it relates to local identity, cultural heritage and “the DNA of the region”

Local identity is a vital component in the urban development and acts as an important aspect to the quality of the festival. Identities are formed by the various elements from the region, it creates a bond between the surrounding environments, and other local cities, and its citizens. A farmer’s market could be a fine example. The locals have inherited skills, when it comes to craftmanship, booths that will present these “products” – examples could be… honey, pastries, local commodities, local grown vegetables and so on. Local farmers would be a part of this idea to bring their “DNA of the region” to the festival. 

Available resources in Nome that supports the concept/idea

Øvre Verket. Photo: Maren Sandbakk

We want to eventually set up booths, or some small sized markets in Lunde – also maybe some booths around the Telemark Canal – the restaurant there is already attracting customers, so with booths up there would increase even more visitors.  Øvre Verket is a collection of protected worker housing from the 1850s, linked to Ulefos Jernværk. Øvre Verket offers restaurant, exhibitions, galleries/workshops, an antique shop and a gift shop. An exhibition is also an idea we’ve looked at, have things out for display – an outside museum if you will, this would be set up at summers or when there is good weather.  

Stakeholders

It would be better to name both internal and external stakeholders in order to better understand who they are and effectively work on how to interest them in our project. In our case, internal stakeholders are us, students who are working on the project. Our main goal is to attract as many external stakeholders as possible in order to create a sustain festival and increase its popularity. When it comes to the external stakeholders, we must consider the following questions: What would encourage them to support our project? Should they participate in our festival? What motivates them most of all? According to this it would be the best option to include Nome Kommune (government), USN, the ironworks, Øvre verket, Villa Lunde, Lindheim, local farmers and producers.

We think festivals are the best way for communication between two parties. Producers/entrepreneurs have possibility to meet their customers face to face and show what they do and how they do, update them and increase product/service awareness among them. In addition to this, the companies can gain new customers and penetrate to new markets. 

For consumers, let’s say, for those who will spend their free time on our festival, will be the best option to communicate to the producers directly. They will have possibility to get to know to the new products/services and trends that are on market, they can purchase desired product/service at a more reasonable price and simply enjoy the event, because the festival will not only be “revenue based”. There will happen many other interesting things besides that.

Target group

Demographic segmentation would be the best fit for our festival. Our main target groups are local and regional tourists. According to the Dyrsku’n experience, there have been some tourists from Sweden, Denmark and Lithuania. What we want to say is that our segment is local tourists, but it does not exclude tourists from outside Norway. Any kind of traveler or interested person can come and enjoy the festival.

Moreover, in addition to the traditional segmentation, we think of creating a family-friendly festival. What we mean by that? As we mentioned before, it is not only the “commercial based” festival. The mentioned festival is based on different activities where both singles and married couples with children will have chance to experience something new, interesting and spend a fantastic time together.

National and International Trends

The following trends can characterize our festival: Farmers market, booths, exhibitions, local heritage/cultural heritage.

  • Farmer’s market – is becoming more and more popular among visitors. At farmers’ market, local farmers, growers and other food producers or vendors come together to sell their products directly to the public. Farmers market offers small farmers the chance to market their produce, incubate their businesses, and supplement their income. However, farmers’ markets are also helping to create robust local economies and more vibrant communities, bringing buyers to long-neglected downtown areas and other traditional retail centers.
  • Booths – seems like a great place to go, if you want to taste some of the region’s best.
  • Exhibitions – are a powerful marketing tool that allow to our participants to promote their products/services to a group that may have little or no knowledge of their businesses. 
  • Local heritage / cultural heritage – plays the most important role, because it is the best way to experience local and cultural heritage in the region, get to know new information about the customs and better acquainted with them.

How could VR/AR be integrated in the idea?

VR/AR can be used by the different consumers in order to show to the visitors the process of producing, working environment and so on. It is the best way as well to show different attractions and cultural buildings in a virtual way. Visitors can get possibility to see how the particular building was looking couple of years ago. By using VR/AR we can improve customer engagement, provide a personalized experience and improve their satisfaction.

How could the concept/idea be marketed?

We are thinking of using the following sources: social media, local papers, brochures.

  • Social media – is the most popular and fastest source of information nowadays in Norway. At the top in the list is Facebook then following YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and so on. Therefore, the main focus will be on Facebook, but we are planning to use all the social medias, because they are free and fast to deliver the message to the target group and easy to use. 
  • Local papers – despite of the popularity of the social media, newspapers are still popular in Norway. So, it would be better for us to reach our target market both through newspapers (papiraviser) and online newspaper (nettaviser). Aftenposten and VG are the most popular according to MedieNorge. For that reason, we are thinking of using mentioned two newspapers and TA, Varden and VTB. 
  • Brochures – are budget – friendly tools for marketing that can reach the audience in many ways. It works as a real marketing ad imparting credibility regarding the company and highlighting its various aspects. No one can deny the importance of digital marketing, but brochures still play an important role in marketing. Many surveys show that 7 out of 10 tourists, as well as visitors, tend to pick up brochures, 95% visitors that obtain brochures become aware of a business/event and 80% of people consider visiting the business/event they saw in brochures. These stats clearly show that brochures are nothing less than a novelty in today’s paperless world.

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